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She wasn't wearing a tallit, so what?

 

 

If you watch this clip, you'll observe, starting at about 2:15, a woman being talked to by two policemen.  She is then led away to the Machkama police station.  She can be seen as even shrugging her shoulders.
 
She is, by the way, outside the Chain Gate which leads to the Temple Mount, from which she had just exited.  She's outside the holy site.
 
Here:
 
 
 
another
 
 
 
She's the founding principal of the girl's Ulpana, Lehava, in Kedumim, Samaria.
 
Her name is Sarah Eliash.
 
She was detained for over three hours.  Her suspected crime?
 
Praying. 
 
Inside the Temple Mount.
 
Was there a riot caused?  No.  Was the a disturbance of the public order?  No.
 
She left the Temple Mount with no injured behind her.
 
 
Veteran Israeli educator and Education Prize awardee Sarah Eliash was arrested this week on the Temple Mount on charges of praying at the site, activists in organizations advocating open Jewish prayer at the site said.  Eliash ascended the site Thursday with a group that came to the Mount to view the site where the miracle of Hanukkah actually took place, and apparently was seen by Arab guards moving her lips, which they attributed to praying. The guards informed Israeli police, who took Eliash into custody for her “crime.”
 
Okay, she wasn't wearing a tallit.  No prayer shawl.  She isn't a member of the Women of the Wall group.
 
Does that mean the mainstream media was justified in downplaying the incident?  
 
Did they report at all?
 
Can you find it?
 
Was her arrest not newsworthy because she wasn't from the Reform or liberal wing of Judaism?
 
She wasn't feminine enough?
 
Not pretty enough?
 
No colorful tallit?
 
This we could read yesterday:
 
Four Women of the Wall arrested amid 'escalation of restrictions' on Jewish women's rights
 
Jewish group claims new decree was issued Friday morning, forbidding women from entering the plaza with Jewish holy articles, tallit and tefilin; World Union for Progressive Judaism calls for third prayer section at Western Wall where men and women can pray together.
 
Or was she perhaps much too nationalist?  Too religiously observant?
 
Did you find it in Haaretz?  Yedioth?  In the other press?
 
Odd, no?
 
Religious freedom belongs only to one type of Jew?
 
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