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Egypt's Missing Peace

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Egypt: The dictatorship mentality
With the help of the social networks and internet, the revolution made it very clear to the Supreme Council of Armed Forces (SCAF) that the old days of brainwashing the people are gone. The beauty of Facebook and Twitter is that people from all over the world are suddenly connected to each other and they can all share news and views. The guided media and government censorship lost its control over the hearts and minds of my Egypt, but the SCAF didn’t want to let up on its power to manipulate and brainwash the people of my Egypt.
 
The Egyptian government produced a series of ads warning the Egyptian people from talking or interacting with foreigners. They claimed that they are all potential spies and that by not talking to them we will be saving our Egypt from these bad, nasty spies. The first time I saw this lousy ad I realized without a doubt that SCAF is ready to do whatever it takes to silence and control the people. To put this in perspective, consider what it would cost Egypt to encourage unfriendliness and suspicion of foreigners. As a country that relies on tourism as one of its essential resources—a resource that gives 4 million direct jobs and 10 million indirect jobs—damaging the tourism market would cost a total of 14 million jobs feeding probably close to 14 million families. After the revolution already had affected tourism pretty badly, our beloved SCAF took the action to help repair the tourism industry by spreading paranoia against tourists and foreigners. This move was outrageous and offensive to everyone. They can't make us live in the dark ages anymore by trying to isolate us from the rest of the world and from the obvious truth of their oppression.
 
On May 31st, the government announced the expiration and suspension of the emergency law, a law that controlled us for 31 years. I couldn’t believe that we would finally be treated fairly by the law. Then, two weeks later, the justice department gave full authority to the military police and intelligence to detain civilians and try them to military tribunals, making the emergency law we hated look like an angel compared to this new military initiative.
 
So where are we now? During the Mubarak’s days, my Egypt was a police state; suddenly, we found ourselves under the rule of a military state. It's very clear now that the independence and integrity of the justice system has gone with the wind.

In the very next day, SCAF dissolved the parliament in order to get rid of the Islamic parties. I was always critical of the weak performance of the parliament, but I highly disagree with dissolving it in such way. They didn’t do it for the greater good, they just did it to strip us of any power.
 
So where does this leave my Egypt? She has no president, no constitution, no parliament, and soon enough, any talking to foreigners could be seen as reason be charged of treason. It's funny, but in the saddest way possible.
 
These actions tells me that SCAF will never hand the power over to any civilian, even if it will means arresting and court martialing everyone who disagree with them.
 
I am almost 100% certain that the elections are already settled in favor of Ahmed Shafeeq. He is a military man and he is considered family to the SCAF generals. Everything tells me that this is the plan even if it will cause the country to burn down.
 
Honestly, although I am scared and freaked out, I've decided to go to my election station: I won’t vote for any of the 2 candidates, I will simply repeal my vote and write down go to hell our beloved SCAF.
 
As I said before, it is a fight to the death for who gets the power. They don’t care about my people or the suffering we feel everyday because of their sadistic and narcissistic ideology.
 
I ask you all to pray for my Egypt because the coming days are so dark: I tell you there will be blood. 
 

I pray that Allah be with Egypt and her people.

 

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